Michael Feinstein Tickets for Sale

Michael Feinstein was born in Columbus, OH, and developed an interest in the piano and in show music at an early age. After moving with his family to Los Angeles in 1976, he met Oscar Levant's widow, who in turn introduced him to Ira Gershwin. He was hired by Gershwin in 1977 to help organize The Gershwin archives, and continued to work with the lyricist until Gershwin's death in 1983.

In 1984, Feinstein launched a career as a pianist and singer devoted to the music of the '30s and '40s, playing at private parties in the Los Angeles area. He had a seven-month residence at the Mondrian Hotel, during which Liza Minnelli threw a party in his honor (February 1985) that got his name around. In January 1986, he opened at the Algonquin Hotel in New York, where a six-week engagement stretched to 16 weeks.

Feinstein's debut album, Live at the Algonquin, mixed the songs of Irving Berlin and Oscar Levant with more current material by Stephen Sondheim and Gretchen Cryer. By 1988 he had been signed to Elektra Records, for whom he has recorded a series of albums spotlighting the work of specific composers, among them 1998's Michael & George: Feinstein Sings Gershwin, as well as a children's album.
By this time, Feinstein was becoming increasingly involved in writing and performing for television and films. He has also presented several series about the great American songwriters for BBC Radio 2. On his second album, Live At The Algonquin, Feinstein sang Raymond Jessel's 'I Wanna Hear A Show Song' ('Please don't bend my ear with punk or funk - it's junk'), which summed up his musical philosophy perfectly. One of the joys of his performances is that he includes rarely heard songs - and unfamiliar verses to more popular songs - and sings them as he believes the writers intended them to be sung. His voice has been called 'overly stylized - the high notes being rather faint, while the lower register is too loud'. Nevertheless, he has a good ear for phrasing, and is recognized as a leading expert and exponent of the American standard popular song.