Los Lobos Tickets for Sale

There are so many intellectual reasons to champion Los Lobos, such as their American Dream-like rise from the "other" side of the Los Angeles River to international stardom, or their nearly seamless stylistic embrace of blues, rockabilly, R&B, country, heartland rock, jazz, folk, Tex-Mex, norteno and Mexican traditionals, their success at delivering without compromise the music of their Mexican-American heritage to a wider audience, and their uncommon ability to bring people of various cultures together through their music. But more than anything else, Los Lobos are just a great rock band.

Los Lobos was one of America's most distinctive and original bands of the '80s. They may have had a hit with "La Bamba" in 1987, yet that cover barely scratches the surface of their talents. Los Lobos is eclectic in the best sense of the word. While they draw equally from rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues, and traditional Spanish and Mexican music, their music never sounds forced or self-conscious. Instead, all of their influences become one graceful, gritty sound. From their very first recordings their rich musicality was apparent; on nearly every subsequent record they have found ways to redefine and expand their sound, without ever straying from the musical traditions that form the heart and soul of the band.

Friends in East L.A. recognized such greatness early, as the band (David Hidalgo, Cesar Rosas, Louie Perez, Conrad R. Lozano and later, Steve Berlin) gigged at neighborhood parties for years before venturing west to Hollywood. This era is documented in the band's impossible-to-find 1978 indie release, which also led to upstart indie label Slash giving the band a Hollywood-based home. With the rollicking, bi-lingual EP ...And A Time To Dance (1983), the wolves were soon known as a Mexican-American version of label-mates, the Blasters. Featuring the double attack of the blues-busting Rosas and the more angelic-toned Hidalgo, the stunning How Will The Wolf Survive? (1984) expanded the band's palette by bringing more rootsy styles and common-man themes to the fiesta. The all-English By The Light Of The Moon (1987) unsuccessfully sought a wider audience. Ironically, it was a Spanish song, their version of the Mexican traditional "La Bamba," that earned the band more airplay that they could have ever anticipated. Suddenly, Los Lobos were stars.

With success on their side, Los Lobos retreated with the all-acoustic, all-Spanish La Pistola Y El Corazon (1988), and then issued the rock-solid Neighborhood (1990). From there, the band has stretched its definition even further. But whether experimenting full-bore, as on the extraordinary Kiko (1992) and the like-minded Colossal Head (1996), or celebrating family, as on the children's album Papa's Dream (1995), Los Lobos remains a singular and powerful musical force, not to mention a cultural jewel for the city of Los Angeles.
Los Lobos is an American rock band, heavily influenced by rock and roll, Tex-Mex, country music, folk, R&B, blues, and traditional Spanish and Mexican music such as boleros and norteños.

Los Lobos released an independent EP in the late 1970s, and a second EP in 1983. Their first major label critically acclaimed release was 1984's T-Bone Burnett produced, How Will the Wolf Survive?. In the years that followed, Los Lobos released a follow-up album entitled By the Light of the Moon, and . It was also at that time that they recorded some Ritchie Valens covers for the soundtrack to the film La Bamba, including the title track which became a number one single for the band. In 1988 they followed with another album, La Pistola y el Corazón featuring original and classical norteño songs. Seen as akin to commercial suicide, the album sold poorly.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s the band toured extensively throughout the world, opening for such acts as Bob Dylan and The Grateful Dead.

Los Lobos returned with The Neighborhood in 1990, and the creative and wildly experimental Kiko (produced by Mitchell Froom) in 1992. In 1991, the band contributed a lively cover of Bertha, a song which they often performed live, to the Grateful Dead tribute/rain forest benefit album Deadicated.

On the band's 20 year anniversary, they released a two CD collection of singles, out-takes, live recordings and hits entitled Just Another Band From East L.A.

In 1995, Los Lobos released the children's record Papa's Dream on Music for Little People Records. The band also scored the film Desperado and contributed tracks to several other soundtracks and tribute albums.

In 1996, the band released Colossal Head. In spite of the fact that the album was critically acclaimed, Warner Brothers decided to drop the band from their roster. Los Lobos spent the next few years on side projects.

Los Lobos signed to Hollywood Records in 1999, and released This Time. Hollywood also reissued 1977's Del Este de Los Angeles.

In 2000, Rhino/Warner Archives released the Cancionero: Mas y Mas box set.

In 2002, the band released their Mammoth Records debut, Good Morning Aztlan.

They released The Ride in 2004.

Band members include David Hidalgo, Steve Berlin, Conrad Lozano, Cesar Rosas, and Louie Pérez.

On the night of October 23, 1999, while the band was on tour, Sandra Rosas, wife of Cesar Rosas, was kidnapped from her house and she was never found again. Gabriel Gomez was accused and sentenced for her kidnapping and murder.

Discography
...And a Time to Dance, 1983
How Will the Wolf Survive?, 1984
La Bamba [Original Soundtrack], 1987
By the Light of the Moon, 1987
La Pistola y El Corazon, 1988
The Neighborhood, 1990
Kiko, 1992
Music For Papa's Dream, 1995
Colossal Head, 1996
This Time, 1999
Del Este de Los Angeles (Just Another Band From East L.A.), 2000
Good Morning Aztlán, 2002
The Ride, 2004
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