Dead Meadow Tickets for Sale

Dead Meadows music is a reflection of many elements: dense, moony, sparky, euphoric, meditative and reminiscent. Many of their aggressive rock co-bands divvy up these dimensions, but do not misunderstand Dead Meadow for banner flaring-waving exponents of the genre. The band exhibits its greatest transonic range to date on their fourth and most fully completed album,, from the Sabbath/Budgie-like towering muck of "Lets Jump In" and "Eyeless Gaze All Eyes/Dont Tell the Riverman" to the psychedelic "At Her Open Door" and "Such Hawks Such Hounds" to the Byrdsian mellifluous sound of the splendidly verbed "Stacys Song." With the addition of guitarist Cory Shane, the bands first album as a quartet,On Feathers, Dead Meadow rustles and expresses as much as they biff and shudder. Unlike their lapidator sects, who are often unrelentingly lumberous in a one-dimension manner, Dead Meadow understands the intrinsic power of painting in elusive shades. Dead Meadow met in the DC punk/indie scene, and the band formed in the fall of 1998 from the ashes of local bands The Impossible Five and Colour, when singer-guitarist Jason Simon, bassist Steve Kille, and drummer Mark Laughlin set out to conflate their love of 70's hard rock and 60's subcultures with their love for writers J.R.R. Tolkien and H.P. Lovecraft.
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Dead Meadow album 'Feathers' is the fourth studio album first as a foursome with new guitarist Cory Shane. Dead Meadow plays an uncommon intermix of unflawed Hendrix/Sabbath riffage, moony psychics, harsh divergent beats, sordid blues-rock, and subcultured jams, with strange high-pitched vocals. Miles beyond "stoner rock" assemblage, this is a attractively earthy sound, played by skillful spontaneous musicians. Dead Meadow released their six-song debut in 2000 on Fugazi bassist Joe Lally's Tolotta Records, followed by a vinyl group release on D.C. indie label Planaria Records. They released their second album, Howls From The Hills, on Tolotta in 2001. The band grew to embrace everything from close guitar drones to billowy psych-funk hurls, blues-folk tunes to sedative-hypnotic rock, and southern slow jazz thrown in without missing its live essence for a good measure.

The original drummer Mark Laughlin unwillingly quit the group, to be substituted by old friend and previous collaborator Stephen McCarty in 2002. The band also found an improbable patron in Brian Jonestown Massacre's Anton Newcombe, who recorded, produced and printed Dead Meadow's live disc 'Got Live if You Want'. Later they recorded a Peel Session at the BBC Fugazi practice space.
Dead Meadow self-produced 'Shivering King And Others' in the cellar studio of the DC Pirate House over five months, followed by a busy schedule of touring as soon as they signed with Matador in 2003. With the heavy rockers and bluesy numbers as on the previous two records, the band went intense into the colorful sphere, with chiming acoustical impinging and soft, stupefying ballads. With the add-on of 2nd guitarist Cory Shane and attractively spacious production house, 'Feathers' opens up the Dead Meadow sound astoundingly apparent at once empirical and approachable more than anything they had recorded thus far. The record seizes the magnitude of their live show, but songs like "At Her Open Door" and "Stacy's Song" reveal an neurotic beauty as cacophonous as absolute volume. Jason's guitar skills are at its peak, as powered by the buzzing modal character of Eastern music as by classic rock riffs. Dead Meadow persist as one step ahead of expectations as they plunge deeper.
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